FAQ-Qualified Electrical Worker

Qualified Electrical Worker Certification

Frequently Asked Questions

General
Training Documentation Requirements
Training Requirements
Electrical Audits
PPE Requirements
Risk Assessment


General Questions

1. Who needs Electrical Safety Training?

2. Who needs to be certified as a Qualified Person?

3. Who needs electrical safety training but not qualified as an Electrical Worker?

4. Why do those exposed directly to electrical hazards need to be qualified?

5. How do I Obtain Qualified Electrical Worker status?

6. How often shall Retraining be required?

7. Why do you need to be certified as a Qualified Electrical Person?

8. How Do I obtain a Qualified Electrical Person/Worker Certification?

9. What is the definition of a qualified person?

10. What is the definition of an unqualified person?

11. Is my employer required to document my qualified worker training?

12. What type of documentation is required to prove I am a qualified person?

13. What kind of training is required to become a qualified person?

14. What type of training is required to become a qualified person?

15. How much training is required for me to be a qualified person?

16. How often Is the Qualified Person Required to be Updated?

17. How often should the Employer audit and document the qualified person training to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices?

18. How Should the Employer perform and document assessment of employee’s compliance with safety-related work practices?

19. Are Unqualified Workers Required to be trained?

20. If I take a course in NFPA 70 E does that qualify me as an electrical worker?

21. What are the training requirements to be certified as a qualified electrical person?

22. Can my state electrical license, PE, Contractor or Journeyman meet the requirements of a qualified person?

23. How can I demonstrate proficiency as a qualified person?

24. Is my employer required to document my certification as an electrical qualified person?

25. Is it true that electrical worker may be qualified to perform commercial applications but not qualified to perform industrial applications and vice-versa of electrical work?

26. What is the best way to evaluate my electrical credentials, skills and knowledge?

27. Can I take these classes on-line?

28. What is a qualified electrical worker assessment?

29. What is a Risk assessment?

30. What is a job task analysis?

31. What is a knowledge and skills evaluation?

32. Can I submit prior learning as a verification of training required to meet the qualified person requirements for training?

33. Can I obtain my needed training to become qualified in an online classroom or will I be required to attend all live training?

34. What codes and standards pertain to a qualified electrical person?

35. What is considered a passing grade?

36. What is OSHA Interpretation of a Qualified Person?


Training Documentation Requirements

1. Are details of training for qualified workers required to be documented?

2. How often should documentation of workers’ training be required?

3. Should documentation of workers’ capabilities (knowledge and skills) be readily available?

4. Are details of training for qualified workers required to be documented?

5. How often should documentation of workers training be required?

6. Should documentation of workers capabilities (knowledge and Skill) be readily available?


Training Requirements

1. If I train all of my employees in NFPA 70 E are they considered Qualified?

2. What kind of training is required to become a Qualified Person?

3. How often should a qualified person be retrained?

4. What type of training is required to become a qualified person?

5. How should my training be documented?

6. What are the content requirements of my training?

7. How can I obtain training to become a qualified person?

8. Can I get credit for prior learning?

9. What is a knowledge and skills evaluation?

10. How does the Job Task analysis apply to becoming a Qualified Person?

11. How often are the training qualifications of electrical workers required to be audited?

12. How much training is required for me to be a qualified person?

13. Are Unqualified Workers required to be trained?

14. If I take a course in NFPA 70 E does that qualify me as an electrical worker?

15. What are the training requirements to be certified as a qualified electrical person?

16. What is the best way to evaluate my electrical skills and knowledge?

17. Is there a course of study required to be qualified as an electrical maintenance person?

18. What is a qualified electrical worker assessment?

19. What is Risk Assessment?

20. What is a job task analysis?

21. Can I submit prior learning as verification of required electrical training?

22. Can I obtain my needed training to become qualified in an online classroom or will I be required to attend all live training?

23. What codes and standards pertain to a qualified electrical person?

24. What is considered a passing grade?

25. What type of documentation is required to prove I am a qualified person?


Electrical Audits

1. How is an Audit of Electrical Safety Program performed?

2. Does the audit include field work such as application of principles and procedures?

3. Are there templates or checklists available to help design our annual audit?


Concerning PPE

1. What PPE is needed for the employee to execute his or her work assignment?

2. How do I select and inspect PPE?

3. How do I know my required employer-procedures and specific work practices?

4.How can an increased duration of exposure to an electrical hazard results in a higher frequency of injuries?

5. When am I required to use PPE?

6. How do I determine PPE needed?

7. How do I know if my PPE is right for me?

8. Do I need PPE for resetting a Circuit Breaker?

9. Do I need PPE for replacing blown fuses?

10. Do I need PPE for troubleshooting?

11. Do I need PPE for testing circuits?

12. What is a quick reference to use if I am unsure about the correct PPE?

13. Can I layer PPE to meet Category Risk Level Required?

14. Are hairnets required to have PPE ratings?

15. Are shoes or boots required to have a category risk level?

16. What type gloves do I need in each Category Risk level?

17. Are all workers who enter the MMC required to wear PPE for the largest level of PPE needed?

18. What is the difference between Arc Rating and Flame Rating?

19. Is hearing protection required in a category risk location?

20. Is hearing protection required to have arc and/or flame resistant rating?

21. Does the back of the head require PPE protection when facing a category risk level?


Risk Assessment

1. What does Risk Assessment mean in relation to electrical safety?

2. Who can perform risk assessments in an electrical environment?

3. How do we perform a risk assessment?

4. How do I determine if the risk is high or low?

5. What is the difference between electrical risk assessment and risk management?


General Questions



1. Who needs Electrical Safety Training?

Anyone who is exposed to potential electrical hazards either directly or indirectly. Examples of job titles for those directly exposed to electrical hazards are electricians, maintenance workers, instrument mechanics, multi craft workers, engineers, and electrical technicians. Examples of job titles for those indirectly exposed to electrical hazards are welders, operators, supervisors,management, millwrights, pipe fitters, carpenters, painters and others associated with construction and maintenance.



2. Who needs to be certified as a Qualified Person?

Anyone who is directly exposed to potential electrical hazards. Title examples: electricians, maintenance workers, instrument mechanics, multi craft workers, engineers, and electrical technicians Examples of job titles for those indirectly
exposed to electrical hazards are welders, operators, supervisors, management, millwrights, pipe fitters, carpenters, painters and others associated with construction and maintenance.



3. Who needs electrical safety training but not qualified as an Electrical Worker?

These are people who are not directly working on electrical circuits but their job task requires that they be around or exposed indirectly to electrical hazards. Examples of job titles for those indirectly exposed to electrical hazards because of job task are
welders, operators, supervisors, management, millwrights, pipe fitters, carpenters, painters and others associated with construction and maintenance.



4. Why do those exposed directly to electrical hazards need to be qualified?

NFPA, OSHA, IEEE, NEMA, NEIS, NETA and other electrical standards require those exposed directly to electrical hazards must be a qualified person.


5. How do I Obtain Qualified Electrical Worker status?

A. Perform an assessment of workers skills and knowledge as compared to task expected. See NFPA 70E 110.(2)(E) 2012 Edition

B. Meet the requirements revealed by the assessment. After assessment is finished you will be given course directives based on the assessment results.

C. Obtain certification with documentation (transcript) of your skills and knowledge

D. Documentation transcript of training including OJT will be provided

E. Maintain your certification via continuing education on updated standards



6. How often shall Retraining be required?

A. Every three years for existing qualified persons. see NFPA70E. 110.(D)(3) below.

B. Once a year if your job task change, see below.

C. Once a year an annual audit of training is to make sure that “New Hires” and “Cross-Training are qualified and up to date before the three year interval.

D. NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)(3) Retraining. An employee shall receive additional training (or retraining) under any of the following conditions:

a. NFPA COMMENT: Changed From 2009 110.2(D)(3): New requirement establishing a maximum three year interval for retraining.

b. NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)(1) If the supervision or annual inspections indicate that the employee is not complying with the safety-related work practices

c. (2) If new technology, new types of equipment, or changes in procedures necessitate the use of safety-related work practices that are different from those that the employee would normally use

d. (3) If he or she must employ safety-related work practices that are not normally used during his or her regular job duties

e. NFPA COMMENT: Retraining shall be performed at intervals not to exceed 3 years.

f. NFPA COMMENT: Training must be provided as necessary to ensure that knowledge of the employees, both qualified and unqualified, is up-to-date. This training must be audited and documented

g. NFPA COMMENT: Employees who are assigned to a new work position must receive the necessary training associated with the assignment prior to beginning work…



7. Why do you need to be certified as a Qualified Electrical Person?

A. Our certification is a professional approval not just academic degree.

B. All training is germane to work to be performed. It tells your employer or future employer that you are capable of performing the job tasks required.

C. You receive more than just a certificate, you also receive a detailed transcript of your abilities to perform germane job task.

D. You become more Employable

E. You will be less of a liability for your employer

F. Your troubleshooting and diagnosing ability will increase exponentially.

G. The codes and standards require those performing electrical task to be qualified



8. How Do I obtain a Qualified Electrical Person/Worker Certification?

A. Step 1 Apply for an assessment of your Job Task with Knowledge and Skills evaluation

B. Step 2 Once your Assessment is completed Course Curriculum Descriptive will be assigned to you.

C. Step 3 A password, user name and student ID will be assigned to you. You may now enroll and start classes.

D. Step 4 Once you have successfully completed your courses and related documentation of On the Job Training your certification will be given along with a transcript of courses that have been successfully finished.



9. What is the definition of a qualified person?

The definition is found in all of the NFPA and OSHA Electrical standards. See, Article 100 of NFPA 70, 2011 edition; NFPA 70 E, 2012 edition, NFPA 79 Industrial Machines, Article 3.3.79, 2012 edition; OSHA CFR 1910.399.Subpart S

The definition is: “One Who Has Skills and Knowledge Related to the Construction and Operation of the Electrical Equipment and Installations and Has Received Safety Training on the Hazards Involved” Whether an employee is considered to be a ‘‘qualified person’’ will depend upon various circumstances in the workplace. It is possible and, in fact, likely for an individual to be considered ‘‘qualified’’ with regard to certain equipment in the workplace, but ‘‘unqualified’’ as to other equipment.



10. What is the definition of an unqualified person?

This person is opposite to the requirements of a qualified person. This person does not have the skills and knowledge needed to perform electrical task. Examples of Unqualified Electrical workers who may be exposed to potential electrical hazards because of their job task would be Welders, Pipe fitters, Plumbers,Operators, Millwrights and Mechanics.

All persons who use electrically powered equipment have some potential exposure to electrical hazards. Employers must ensure that all employees understand where electrical hazards exist. Potential exposure to electrical hazards varies by job
assignment. Even employees who are not trained specifically with the goal of becoming qualified persons must be trained to understand how they might be injured from shock/electrocution or arc flash. Unqualified employees must understand the limit of their work assignment as it relates to electrical hazards.



11. Is my employer required to document my qualified worker training?

Yes, see NFPA 70E 110.(2)(E) Training Documentation. The employer shall document that each employee has received the training required by 110.2(D). This documentation shall be made when the employee demonstrates proficiency in the work practices involved and shall be maintained for the duration of the employee’s
employment. The documentation shall contain the content of the training, each employee’s name, and dates of training.

NFPA COMMENT: 110.2(E): Revised to require that the “content of training” be included in the training documentation.

Informational Note: Employment records that indicate that an employee has received the required training are an acceptable means of meeting this requirement.

NFPA COMMENT: Each employer must update the necessary records to indicate that each qualified person has received the training required by 110.2. The record must
include the content of the training provided. The documentation must identify the employee and the date that the training was received. If hard copy documentation is a normal employer record, then the training documentation could be hard copy. If electronic records are the norm for an employer, then an electronic record is acceptable. However, the record must be available for inspection in some form by a third party.

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, the employee must have the training necessary to be knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the equipment associated with the work task or with the specific work method. The person must also be trained in the selection of PPE, including using the PPE in a dry run practice to ensure the PPE does not limit the person's dexterity or vision. If the work task involves a circuit with little association with equipment, a qualified person also must be knowledgeable of the circuit. For instance, when a work task must be
performed in a manhole containing cables and conductors only, the person must be familiar with support requirements and fireproofing methods that might be in
use in the manhole, in addition to the unique hazards associated with the confined space and the potential for a flammable and toxic atmosphere.

NFPA COMMENT: The latest revision of the OSHA definition for qualified person (1910.399 8/07) includes the phrase “has demonstrated skills.” To meet this requirement, the person has to actually demonstrate that he/she can perform the task. A dress rehearsal using appropriate PPE for the task will ensure that the employee can perform the task with the lighting limitations of the flash suit hood and the dexterity limitations of voltage-rated gloves with leather protectors.

NFPA COMMENT: A qualified person must understand how to select appropriate test equipment and apply that equipment to the work task. He or she must be trained to
understand and apply the details of the electrical safety program and procedures provided the employer.

NFPA COMMENT: A qualified person must be able to perform a hazard/risk analysis and to react appropriately to all hazards associated with the work task. Although
licensing programs administered by state and local governments typically have training requirements a candidate must meet prior to being examined and again
periodically after procuring the license, the license in and of itself does not make a person qualified for all tasks that he or she may encounter. Electrical work requires continuing education and demonstration of the necessary skills in order to maintain the requisite skill level to work safely. Part of being a qualified person is recognizing that energized electrical work is permitted only under the conditions specified in
130.2(A).



12. What type of documentation is required to prove I am a qualified person?

Interpretations given by both OSHA and NFPA indicate that certifications and degrees may or may not document that electrical workers knowledge and skills training requirements. The key point is that training must be germane to job task. Also on-the-job training requirements should be documented. The Knowledge and Skills training plus On-the-Job requirements can be found in the Department of Energy Qualified Worker Handbook -1003-96. All Certifications and degrees must be
germane to the type of work being performed or required by the electrical worker.

NFPA COMMENT: Each employer must update the necessary records to indicate that each qualified person has received the training required by 110.2. The record must include the content of the training provided. The documentation must identify the employee and the date that the training was received. If hard copy documentation is a normal employer record, then the training documentation could be hard copy. If electronic records are the norm for an employer, then an electronic record is
acceptable. However, the record must be available for inspection in some form by a third party.



13. What kind of training is required to become a qualified person?

All training must be germane to job task. The Knowledge and Skills training plus On-the-Job requirements can be found in the Department of Energy Qualified Worker Handbook -1003-96. All Certifications and degrees must be germane to the type of work being performed by the electrical worker. Documentation of training must include detailed transcript of training to prove training is germane to job task. The definition of a Qualified Person states the person must have knowledge and skills plus
safety training to understand the operation and construction of equipment and to recognize hazards. This means that this person must understand electrical circuitry (theory) and technical expertise as applied to intended job task.

Example # 1: The job tasks of troubleshooting and maintaining Industrial Machines. This person will be required to understand overcurrent protection,
grounding, bonding, shielding, schematics, wiring diagrams, transformers, motors, motor controls plus related standards to the Machine such as NFPA 79, NFPA 70B, NFPA 70 and NFPA 70E.

Example # 2: The job task requires operation of an Industrial Machine. This person would not be troubleshooting the electrical portion of the machine
and would not need the same training describe in example # 1.



14. What type of training is required to become a qualified person?

Online and live classroom training along with on-the-job training are acceptable methods of training. Typically a combination is required. The kind of training needed is based on assessment results. See question 13

NFPA 70E. 110. 2.B(B) Type of Training. The training required by this section shall be classroom or on-the-job type, or a combination of the two. The degree of training provided shall be determined by the risk to the employee.

NFPA Comment: Classroom training is effective for some objectives, and on-the-job training (OJT) is effective for others. In most instances, effective training makes use of both training processes. The instructor's qualifications are very important. Frequently, new employees learn by emulating a more experienced worker. If the experienced worker understands electrical safety requirements and practices them, the mentoring
process is beneficial to the employee being trained. However, because a significant amount of new information is available, mentors also might require training.

NFPA 70E. 110. 2.B (D) Employee Training.

(1) Qualified Person. A qualified person shall be trained and knowledgeable of the construction and operation of equipment or a specific work method and be trained to recognize and avoid the electrical hazards that might be present with respect to that equipment or work method.

(a) Such persons shall also be familiar with the proper use of the special precautionary techniques; personal protective equipment including arc flash suit;
insulating and shielding materials; and insulated tools and test equipment. A person can be considered qualified with respect to certain equipment and methods but still be unqualified for others.

(b) Such persons permitted to work within the limited approach boundary of exposed energized electrical conductors and circuit parts operating at 50 volts or
more shall, at a minimum, be additionally trained in all of the following:

(1) Skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed energized electrical conductors and circuit parts from other parts of electrical equipment.

(2) Skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed energized electrical conductors and circuit parts.

(3) Approach distances specified in Table 130.4(C)(a) and Table 130.4(C)(b) and the corresponding voltages to which the qualified person will be exposed

(4) Decision-making process necessary to determine the degree and extent of the hazard and the personal protective equipment and job planning necessary to perform the task safely

(c) An employee who is undergoing on-the-job training for the purpose of obtaining the skills and knowledge necessary to be considered a qualified person and who, in the course of such training, has demonstrated an ability to perform specific duties safely at his or her level of training, and who is under the direct
supervision of a qualified person, shall be considered to be a qualified person for the performance of those specific duties.

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, the employee must have the training necessary to be knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the equipment associated with the work task or with the specific work method. The
person must also be trained in the selection of PPE, including using the PPE in a dry run practice to ensure the PPE does not limit the person's dexterity or vision. If the work task involves a circuit with little association with equipment, a qualified person also must be knowledgeable of the circuit.



15. How much training is required for me to be a qualified person?

This depends upon the job task required by the employer and your present skills and knowledge level... For example:

  • Industrial type work would require different training as opposed to commercial type work.
  • System above 600 V verses below 600 V. The training is different for these voltage levels.
  • Construction work versus maintenance type work. Construction work is seldom worked energized while maintenance type work is energized most of the time for troubleshooting, diagnostics, and applications.

All training must be germane to the type work or job task required by the employer.

NFPA COMMENTS: An employee might be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).

Skill And Knowledge To Determine Energized Conductors - Employees must be familiar with the steps necessary to determine which parts of the equipment or circuit(s) are conductive and if those parts are energized.

Skill And Knowledge To Determine Approach Distance -Qualified persons must also be familiar with the limited,restricted, and prohibited approach distances for the nominal voltage of the equipment or circuit.

Testing Knowledge and Skill- Employees must be trained to select an appropriate voltage-detecting device. The selected voltage-detecting device must be appropriate for the circuit associated with the work. Non-contact devices are appropriate in some circumstances; however, voltmeters that make direct contact with the conductor in question provide the best chance of avoiding an error. Qualified persons must understand all limitations associated with the voltage-detecting device. Qualified persons must be able to execute a visual inspection of the device.

Skill And Knowledge Training - Qualified persons must receive training, as necessary, to ensure that they are familiar with requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program… and with other applicable codes and standards. The training must establish that a qualified employee understands the limitations associated with protective equipment, tools, and test equipment. A qualified person must recognize and accept his or her personal limitations associated with both skill and knowledge.

An Apprentice or other employee undergoing training to become a qualified person is considered qualified if he or she is under the direct supervision of a qualified person.

Unqualified For The Task - An employee who has not performed a work task involved with work on or near an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part for one or more years is considered to be unqualified for the task until the employee has been retrained.

Employers Are Required To Perform An Assessment - As part of their responsibilities in developing and implementing an electrical safety program, employers are required to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices at least once a year.



16. How often Is the Qualified Person Required to be Updated?

Every Three Years to coincide with code cycles and must be audited every year for relative Changed From 2009, 70E NFPA 110.2(D)(3): New requirement establishing a maximum three year interval for retraining.

NFPA COMMENT: Training must be provided as necessary to ensure that knowledge of the employees, both qualified and unqualified, is up-to-date. Employees who are assigned to a new work position must receive the necessary training associated with the assignment prior to beginning work that could expose him or her to an electrical hazard. When, through normal supervision or through annual or other inspections, a
supervisor recognizes that an employee is not implementing requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program, the employee must receive additional training before being permitted to work on or near exposed energized electrical conductors or circuit parts. If additional or new equipment that provides new or additional hazards or methods of exposure is added, employees must receive more training to develop the necessary understanding. Employees who are reassigned to work tasks associated with equipment that normally is not used in their day-to-day functions are particularly likely to be exposed to potential injury. Such employees must be trained to establish the necessary level of understanding. To ensure that an employee is up-to-date on
safe work practices, he or she is required to receive safety-related retraining at least every three years.



17. How often should the Employer audit and document the qualified person training to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices?

Changed From 2009 110.2(D)(1)(f): New requirement for annual employer confirmation of employee compliance with safety-related work practices.

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, the employee must have the training necessary to be knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the
equipment associated with the work task or with the specific work method. The person must also be trained in the selection of PPE, including using the PPE in a dry run practice to ensure the PPE does not limit the person's dexterity or vision. If the work task involves a circuit with little association with equipment, a qualified person also must be knowledgeable of the circuit.

Professional Licensing: For a person to be considered qualified, he or she must have received the safety training identified in 110.2(A) and 110.2(C) of this standard, in addition to employee training contained in this section. An employee might be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).

Testing: Employees must be trained to select an appropriate voltage-detecting device. The selected voltage-detecting device must be appropriate for the circuit associated with the work. Qualified persons must understand all limitations associated with the voltage-detecting device.

Training: Qualified persons must receive training, as necessary, to ensure that they are familiar with requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program, with NFPA 70E, and with other applicable codes and standards. The training must establish that a qualified employee understands the limitations associated with protective equipment, tools, and test equipment. A qualified person must recognize and accept his or her personal limitations associated with both skill and knowledge.

Apprentice: An apprentice or other employee undergoing training to become a qualified person is considered qualified if he or she is under the direct supervision of a
qualified person.

NEW HIRES AND CROSS TRAINING: An employee who has not performed a work task involved with work on or near an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part for one or more years is considered to be unqualified for the task until the employee has been retrained.

Annual Documentation: As part of their responsibilities in developing and implementing an electrical safety program, employers are required to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices at
least once a year. This assessment can be accomplished either through regular supervision of an employee or through inspection of an employee's work activities.



18. How Should the Employer perform and document assessment of
employee’s compliance with safety-related work practices?

Annual audit performed by employer supervision See checklist and training provided by U of A for this audit.


19. Are Unqualified Workers Required to be trained?

Some employees have minimal exposure to electrical hazards, especially when equipment is effectively maintained. For instance, arc flash training is not necessary for an office worker who is never exposed to an arc flash. Workers who are not exposed to medium and high voltages might not need to be trained to understand the characteristics of higher-voltage energy.

If any risk of injury from electrical energy exists, employees must be trained to recognize and deal with risk. Sometimes, the risk of injury is of sufficient magnitude that the work task should not be executed.

Training should include formal presentations and actual performance of the work under the supervision of knowledgeable persons. Some work tasks contain minimum exposure, and others expose workers to significant hazards. For instance, operating
personnel could be required to operate the handle of a disconnect switch or to push a reset button with doors closed and latched, while maintenance personnel could be required to open doors or remove covers and perform diagnostic tasks. Additionally, the training provided to each of these employees could be different depending on the risk of injury.



20. If I take a course in NFPA 70 E does that qualify me as an electrical worker?

No, if that were true you could take a person with no prior experience or training, train them on NFPA 70E and they are qualified. Sounds a little ridiculous, but there are those who tell others NFPA 70E is all they need. NFPA 70 E is only a companion standard and a compatible standard with the other NFPA electrical standards such as NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, NFPA 79 Industrial Machines, and NFPA 70B Electrical Maintenance. NFPA 70 is the main standard.



21. What are the training requirements to be certified as a qualified
electrical person?

1. NFPA 70E.110.2 Training Requirements.

(A) Safety Training. The training requirements contained in this section shall apply to employees who face a risk of electrical hazard that is not reduced to a safe level
by the applicable electrical installation requirements. Such employees shall be trained to understand the specific hazards associated with electrical energy. They shall be trained in safety-related work practices and procedural requirements, as necessary, to
provide protection from the electrical hazards associated with their respective job or task assignments. Employees shall be trained to identify and understand the relationship between electrical hazards and possible injury.

Informational Note: For further information concerning installation requirements, see NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code®.

NFPA COMMENTS: A base expectation of Article 110 is that when operating normally, an installation is safe if all of the following conditions are met:

•It has been installed in accordance with the NEC.
•It has been installed in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions.
•It has been installed in accordance with any requirements that are mandated by a product listing.

•It is adequately maintained using the manufacturer's recommendations and/or the recommendations from recognized industry practices such as NFPA 70B.

If the installation or equipment fails to meet these conditions, employees face an elevated risk of injury. For example, an equipment door or cover left with fasteners unlatched or equipment that is not adequately maintained does not meet the requirements of the NEC, and both of these situations cause employees to be exposed to an electrical hazard.

Each employee who is or might be exposed to an elevated risk of injury by exposure to an electrical hazard must be trained to understand the specific hazards to which he or she might be exposed. To increase understanding, the training should include the following:

•What electrical hazards are present in the workplace

•How each electrical hazard affects body tissues

•How to determine the degree of each hazard

•How to avoid exposure to each hazard

•How to minimize risk by body position

•What PPE is needed for the employee to execute his or her work assignment

•How to select and inspect PPE

•What employer-provided procedures, including specific work practices, the employee must implement

•How increased duration of exposure to an electrical hazard results in a higher frequency of injuries

•How to perform a hazard identification and risk assessment analysis

•How to determine limited, restricted, and prohibited approach boundaries and recognize that these boundaries are related to protection from exposure to electrical shock and electrocution

•How to interpret the information on equipment labels [see 130.5(C)] and select the appropriate PPE when working within the arc flash boundary

Although 110.2(A) defines specific necessary training, the key term in this section is
understand. The safety training must include all information and training processes necessary to achieve understanding. The training must develop an understanding of how to avoid all hazard exposure or how to minimize exposure if a hazard remains when the work is to be performed. Employees must understand the characteristics of protective equipment that might be necessary to avoid injury if an incident occurs while exposure exists. Employees must also understand that avoiding exposure is the only viable means of avoiding injury in event of an incident while the task is being performed. Generally, employees should understand when, if, and how exposure to each hazard might exist at each step in the work task.

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, he or she must have received the safety training identified in NFPA 70E, 110.2(A) and 110.2(C), in addition to employee (related technical) training contained in this section. An employee might
be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).



22. Can my state electrical license, PE, Contractor or Journeyman
meet the requirements of a qualified person?

NO see the NFPA comment below.

NFPA COMMENT: A qualified person must be able to perform a
hazard/risk analysis and to react appropriately to all hazards
associated with the work task. Although licensing programs
administered by state and local governments typically have
training requirements a candidate must meet prior to being
examined and again periodically after procuring the license, the
license in and of itself does not make a person qualified for all
tasks that he or she may encounter. Electrical work requires
continuing education and demonstration of the necessary skills in
order to maintain the requisite skill level to work safely. Part
of being a qualified person is recognizing that energized
electrical work is permitted only under the conditions specified
in 130.2(A).

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, he or she
must have received the safety training identified in NFPA 70E,
110.2(A) and 110.2(C), in addition to employee (related
technical) training contained in this section. An employee might
be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for
another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure
that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with
such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).



23. How can I demonstrate proficiency as a qualified person?

Proficiency is proven by two methods; one by testing and two by demonstration to another qualified person.



24. Is my employer required to document my certification as an electrical qualified person?

Yes, see question number three


25. Is it true that electrical worker may be qualified to perform commercial applications but not qualified to perform industrial applications and vice-versa of electrical work?

Yes, certification or training must be germane to the type work being performed. See an OSHA interpretation below.

OSHA Interpretation to Qualified Person Requirements:

NOTE 1: Whether an employee is considered to be a ‘‘qualified person’’ will depend upon various circumstances in the workplace. It is possible and, in fact, likely for an
individual to be considered ‘‘qualified’’ with regard to certain equipment in the workplace, but ‘‘unqualified’’ as to other equipment. (See § 1910.332(b)(3) for training requirements that specifically apply to qualified persons.)



26. What is the best way to evaluate my electrical credentials, skills and knowledge?

Through a knowledge and skills evaluation examination. This examination will reveal the takers knowledge of electrical circuitry, theory, and understanding of safety applications. It also determines training needed to certify an individual as a
qualified person.



27. Can I take these classes on-line?

Yes - Contact:

The University of Alabama, College of Continuing Studies, UA Safe State,

Mr. Peter Hodgson

Telephone 205-348-4063,Email phodgson@ccs.ua.edu



28. What is a qualified electrical worker assessment?

An assessment determines the job task required by the employer and the training needed to become qualified in relation to job task required by the employer.



29. What is a Risk assessment?

When a worker determines the potential risk of any job task they may attempt.



30. What is a job task analysis?

This analysis determines the type work task or job task required by the employer of the employee. Qualifications must meet this requirements.



31. What is a knowledge and skills evaluation?

This evaluation is an examination to determine if the worker understands the knowledge and skills needed to perform job task required by the employer. For example if part of the job task asked the employee to know how to troubleshoot transformers and power systems then the employee would be required to understand
how the transformer works. If the employee understands the operation and construction or theory of how the transformer works there is no need for training in this area. However, it evaluation determines that the employee does not understand how the transformer works then training on transformers is recommended. When the knowledge and skills evaluation is completed the employee will be given course directives required to be certified as a qualified electrical person. These directives fill in the gap of training needed to be certified.



32. Can I submit prior learning as a verification of training required to meet the qualified person requirements for training?

Yes you can. This prior learning will be compared to the job task required by your employer and the DOE handbook 1003-96 for qualified persons.



33. Can I obtain my needed training to become qualified in an online
classroom or will I be required to attend all live training?

Online is available Contact: The University of Alabama, College of Continuing Studies, UA Safe State, Mr. Peter Hodgson Telephone 205-348-4063,Email phodgson@ccs.ua.edu

All classroom training can be taught online. Some classes may require labs or on-the-job training.



34. What codes and standards pertain to a qualified electrical person?

NFPA, OSHA, IEEE,NEIS, NEMA, and NETA



35. What is considered a passing grade?

75% is considered a passing grade by the DOE handbook 1003-96. Most schools require 80%



36. What is OSHA Interpretation of a Qualified Person?

Depending upon which standard you are looking at. All the definition are the basically the same. OSHA does put informational notes that qualification of the worker must match the intended job task. NFPA say the same thing with NFPA commentary to each of the electrically relates standards.


Training Documentation Requirements



1. Are details of training for qualified workers required to be documented?

Yes, all training must be germane and applicable to job tasks to be performed. Both NFPA and OSHA require documented transcripts of classroom, and online training. On the Job Training (OJT) must be available and documented for each worker. The objective is to make sure that a person is not working out of their area of
expertise. See NFPA 70 E.110.H.3

NFPA COMMENT: NFPA 70 E.110.2.E

(E) Training Documentation. The employer shall document that each employee has received the training required by 110.2(D). This documentation shall be made when the employee demonstrates proficiency in the work practices involved and shall be maintained for the duration of the employee’s employment. The documentation shall contain the content of the training, each employee’s name, and dates of training.

Changed From 2009

•110.2(E): Revised to require that the “content of training” be included in the training
documentation.

Informational Note: Employment records that indicate that an employee has received the required training are an acceptable means of meeting this requirement.

Each employer must update the necessary records to indicate that each qualified person has received the training required by 110.2. The record must include the content of the training provided. The documentation must identify the employee and the date that the training was received. If hard copy documentation is a normal employer record, then the training documentation could be hard copy. If electronic records are the norm for an employer, then an electronic record is acceptable. However, the record must be available for inspection in some form by a third party.



2. How often should documentation of workers’ training be required?

Documentation is required to be updated annually. “New hires” and “cross training” documentation should be made available when job tasks begin. Qualified persons must update their training and documentation every three years.

Once a year an annual audit of training is to make sure that “New Hires” and “Cross-Training” are qualified and up to date before the three year interval.

NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)(3) Retraining. An employee shall receive additional training (or retraining) under any of the following conditions:

NFPA COMMENT: Changed From 2009 110.2(D)(3): New requirement establishing a maximum three year interval for retraining.

NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)

(1) If the supervision or annual inspections indicate that the employee is not complying with the safety-related work practices

(2) If new technology, new types of equipment, or changes in procedures necessitate the use of safety-related work practices that are different from those that the employee would normally use

(3) If he or she must employ safety-related work practices that are not normally used during his or her regular job duties

NFPA COMMENT: Retraining shall be performed at intervals not to exceed 3 years.

NFPA COMMENT: Training must be provided as necessary to ensure that knowledge of the employees, both qualified and unqualified, is up-to-date. This training must be audited and documented.



3. Should documentation of workers’ capabilities (knowledge and skills) be readily available?

Yes, all training must be germane and applicable to job tasks to be performed. Knowledge and skill are a part of the definition of a qualified person. The worker must know electrical theory of equipment, overcurrent protection, grounding and bonding techniques, wiring methods, transformers, motors, motor controls and specialty areas to be able to properly assess potential electrical hazards. “The employer shall document that each employee has received the training required by 110.2(D). This documentation shall be made when the employee demonstrates proficiency in the work practices involved and shall be maintained for the duration of the employee’s employment. The documentation shall contain the content of the training, each employee’s name, and dates of training.

Changed From 2009

•110.2(E): Revised to require that the “content of training” be included in the training documentation. “ And “ If hard copy documentation is a normal employer record, then the training documentation could be hard copy. If electronic records are the norm for an employer, then an electronic record is acceptable. However, the record must be available for inspection in some form by a third party.”



4. Are details of training for qualified workers required to be documented?

Yes, all training must be germane and applicable to job tasks to be performed. Both NFPA and OSHA require documented transcript of classroom, online, and O.J. T must be available and documented for each worker. The objective is to make sure that a person is not working out of their area of expertise.



5. How often should documentation of workers training be required?

Documentation is required to be updated annually. “New Hires” and “cross training” documentation should be made available when job task begins. Existing qualified persons must update every three years.



6. Should documentation of workers capabilities (knowledge and Skill)
be readily available?

Yes, all training must be germane and applicable to job tasks to be performed. Knowledge and skill is a part of the definition of a qualified person. The worker must know electrical theory of equipment, overcurrent protection, grounding and bonding techniques, wiring methods, Transformers, motors, motor controls and specialty areas to be able to properly assess potential electrical hazards.


Training Requirements



1. If I train all my employees in NFPA 70 E are they considered Qualified?

No, if that were true you could take anyone off the streets selling shoes, train them on NFPA 70E and they are qualified. Sounds a little ridiculous, but there are those who tell others NFPA 70E is all they need. NFPA 70 E is only a companion standard and a compatible standard with the other NFPA electrical standards such as NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, NFPA 79 Industrial Machines and NFPA 70B Electrical
Maintenance. NFPA 70 is the main standard.



2. What kind of training is required to become a Qualified Person?

All training must be germane to the job task. The Knowledge and Skills training plus On-the-Job requirements can be found in the Department of Energy (DOE) Qualified Worker Handbook -1003-96 and DOE –HBK 1001-96. All certifications and degrees must be germane to the type of work being performed by the electrical worker. Documentation of training must include detailed “transcript of training” to prove
training is germane to the job task. The definition of a Qualified Person states the person must have knowledge and skills plus safety training to understand the operation and construction of equipment and to recognize hazards. This means that this person must understand electrical circuitry (theory) and technical expertise as applied to the intended job task along with how to recognize and rectify electrical hazards.

This has changed from the 2009 NFPA 70E edition. NFPA 70E 110.2(D)(1)(f):

New requirement for annual employer confirmation of employee compliance with safety-related work practices.

Qualified Person

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, the employee must have the training necessary to be knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the equipment associated with the work task or with the specific work method. Additionally, the person must be trained in the selection of PPE, including using the PPE in a dry run practice to ensure the PPE does not limit the person's dexterity or vision. If the work task involves a circuit with little association with equipment, a qualified person also must be knowledgeable of the circuit.

Professional Licensing

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, he or she must have received the safety training identified in NFPA 70E 110.2(A) and 110.2(C) of this standard, in addition to employee training contained in this section. An employee might be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).

Training

NFPA COMMENT: Qualified persons must receive training, as necessary, to ensure that they are familiar with requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program, with NFPA 70E, and with other applicable codes and standards. The training must establish that a qualified employee understands the limitations associated with
protective equipment, tools, and test equipment. A qualified person must recognize and accept his or her personal limitations associated with both skill and knowledge.

Apprentice

NFPA COMMENT: An apprentice or other employee undergoing training to become a qualified person is considered qualified if he or she is under the direct supervision of a qualified person.

New Hires And Cross Training

NFPA COMMENT: An employee who has not performed a work task involved with work on or near an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part for one or more years is considered to be unqualified for the task until the employee has been retrained.



3. How often should a qualified person be retrained?

Every three years for existing qualified persons. See NFPA70E. 110.(D)(3) below:

Once a year an annual audit of training is to make sure that “New Hires” and “Cross-Training” are qualified and up to date before the three year interval.

NFPA COMMENT: Changed From 2009 110.2(D)(3): New requirement establishing a maximum three year interval for retraining.

NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)(3) Retraining. An employee shall receive additional training (or retraining) under any of the following conditions:

NFPA 70 E 110.2(D)

(1) If the supervision or annual inspections indicate that the employee is not complying with the safety-related work practices

(2) If new technology, new types of equipment, or changes in procedures necessitate the use of safety-related work practices that are different from those that the employee would normally use

(3) If he or she must employ safety-related work practices that are not normally used during his or her regular job duties

NFPA COMMENT: Retraining shall be performed at intervals not to exceed
3 years.

NFPA COMMENT: Training must be provided as necessary to ensure that knowledge of the employees, both qualified and unqualified, is up-to-date. This training must be audited and documented.

NFPA COMMENT: Employees who are assigned to a new work position must receive the necessary training associated with the assignment prior to beginning work.



4. What type of training is required to become a qualified person?

Online and live classroom training along with on-the-job training are acceptable methods of training. Typically a combination is required. The kind of training needed is based on assessment results. See question 13



5. How should my training be documented?

It is your employer’s responsibility to maintain your documentation. However, it would be wise for you to maintain all transcripts of your training so that you will have them ready when asked to present.



6. What are the content requirements of my training?

Content of training is based on three factors:

  • Training must be germane to work you plan to perform
  • Content will be based on Department of Energy Qualified Worker Handbook -1003-96
  • Content will be based on the results of your assessment. The assessment measures your job tasks requirements to training needed to be proficient. Training includes related safety and technical training required.



7. How can I obtain training to become considered a qualified person?

Contact: The University of Alabama, College of Continuing Studies, UA
Safe State, Mr. Peter Hodgson Telephone 205-348-4063,Email phodgson@ccs.ua.edu



8. Can I get credit for prior learning?

Yes you can. This prior learning will be compared to the job task required by your employer and the DOE handbook 1003-96 for qualified persons.



9. What is a knowledge and skills evaluation?

This evaluation is an examination to determine if the worker understands the knowledge and skills needed to perform a job task required by the employer. For example, if part of the job task asked the employee to know how to troubleshoot transformers and power systems, then the employee would be required to understand how the transformer works. If the employee understands the operation and
construction or theory of how the transformer works there is no need for training in this area. However, if evaluation determines that the employee does not understand how the transformer works then training on transformers is required.

When the knowledge and skills evaluation is completed the employee will be given course directives required to be certified as a qualified electrical person. These directives fill in the gap of training needed to be certified.



10. How does the Job Task analysis apply to becoming a Qualified Person?

The Job Task analysis ensures that training is germane to the work to be performed.



11. How often are the training qualifications of electrical workers required to be audited?

This has changed from the 2009 NFPA 70E edition. 110.2(D)(1)(f):

New requirement for annual employer confirmation of employee compliance with safety-related work practices.

Qualified Person

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, the employee must have the training necessary to be knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the equipment associated with the work task or with the specific work method. The person must also be trained in the selection of PPE, including using the PPE in a dry run practice to ensure the PPE does not limit the person's dexterity or vision. If the work task involves a circuit with little association with equipment, a qualified person also must be knowledgeable of the circuit.

Professional Licensing

NFPA COMMENT: For a person to be considered qualified, he or she must have received the safety training identified in NFPA 70E 110.2(A) and 110.2(C) of this standard, in addition to employee training contained in this section. An employee might be considered qualified for one task and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).

Testing

NFPA COMMENT: Employees must be trained to select an appropriate voltage-detecting device. The selected voltage-detecting device must be appropriate for the circuit associated with the work. Qualified persons must understand all limitations associated with the voltage-detecting device.

Training

NFPA COMMENT: Qualified persons must receive training, as necessary, to ensure that they are familiar with requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program, with NFPA 70E, and with other applicable codes and standards. The training must establish that a qualified employee understands the limitations associated with
protective equipment, tools, and test equipment. A qualified person must recognize and accept his or her personal limitations associated with both skill and knowledge.

Apprentice

NFPA COMMENT: An apprentice or other employee undergoing training to become a qualified person is considered qualified if he or she is under the direct supervision of a qualified person.

New Hires And Cross Training

NFPA COMMENT: An employee who has not performed a work task involved with work on or near an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part for one or more years is considered to be unqualified for the task until the employee has
been retrained.

Annual Documentation

NFPA COMMENT: As part of their responsibilities in developing and implementing an electrical safety program, employers are required to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices at least once a year. This
assessment can be accomplished either through regular supervision of an employee or through inspection of an employee's work activities.



12. How much training is required for me to be a qualified person?

This depends upon the job task required by the employer and your present skills and knowledge level. For example, Industrial type work would require different training as opposed to commercial type work. System above 600 V verses below 600 V.

The training is different for these voltage levels.

Construction work versus maintenance type work. Construction work is seldom worked energized while maintenance type work is energized most of the time for troubleshooting, diagnostics, and applications.

All training must be germane to the type work or job task required by the employer.

NFPA COMMENTS: An employee might be considered qualified for one task
and unqualified for another. Professional licensing or certification does not ensure that an employee is qualified unless the training associated with such programs fulfills the requirements specified in 110.2(D).

Skill And Knowledge To Determine Energized Conductors - Employees must
be familiar with the steps necessary to determine which parts of the equipment or circuit(s) are conductive and if those parts are energized.

Skill And Knowledge To Determine Approach Distance - Qualified persons
must also be familiar with the limited, restricted, and prohibited approach distances for the nominal voltage of the equipment or circuit.

Testing Knowledge and Skill- Employees must be trained to select an appropriate voltage-detecting device. The selected voltage-detecting device must be appropriate for the circuit associated with the work. Non-contact devices are appropriate in some circumstances; however, voltmeters that make direct contact with the conductor in
question provide the best chance of avoiding an error. Qualified persons must understand all limitations associated with the voltage-detecting device. Qualified persons must be able to execute a visual inspection of the device.

Skill And Knowledge Training - Qualified persons must receive training, as necessary, to ensure that they are familiar with requirements defined in the employer's electrical safety program and with other applicable codes and standards. The training must establish that a qualified employee understands the limitations associated with
protective equipment, tools, and test equipment. A qualified person must recognize and accept his or her personal limitations associated with both skill and knowledge.

An Apprentice or other employee undergoing training to become a qualified person is considered qualified if he or she is under the direct supervision of a qualified person.

Unqualified For The Task - An employee who has not performed a work task involved with work on or near an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part for one or more years is considered to be unqualified for the task until the employee has been retrained.

Employers Are Required To Perform An Assessment - As part of their responsibilities in developing and implementing an electrical safety program, employers are required to perform an assessment of their employees' conformance with safety-related work practices at least once a year.



13. Are Unqualified Workers Required to be trained?

Yes, anyone that maybe exposed to electrical hazards must be trained. There are three categories of unqualified workers: Welders, Operators and General Workers. Only one class is required based on job task. These courses are available online.

Some employees have minimal exposure to electrical hazards, especially when equipment is effectively maintained. For instance, arc flash training is not necessary for an office worker who is never exposed to an arc flash. Workers who are not exposed to medium and high voltages might not need to be trained to understand the characteristics of higher-voltage energy.

If any risk of injury from electrical energy exists, employees must be trained to recognize and deal with risk. Sometimes, the risk of injury is of sufficient magnitude that the work task should not be executed. Training should include formal presentations and actual performance of the work under the supervision of knowledgeable persons. Some work tasks contain minimum exposure, and others expose workers to significant hazards. For instance, operating personnel could be required to operate the handle of a disconnect switch or to push a reset button with doors closed and latched, while maintenance personnel could be required to open doors or remove covers and perform diagnostic tasks. Additionally, the training provided to each of these employees could be different depending on the risk of injury.



14. If I take a course in NFPA 70 E does that qualify me as an
electrical worker?

No, if that were true you could take a person with no prior experienceor training, train them on NFPA 70E and they are qualified. Sounds a little ridiculous, but there are those who tell others NFPA 70E is all they need. NFPA 70 E is only a companion standard and a compatible standard with the other NFPA electrical standards such as NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, NFPA 79 Industrial Machines, and NFPA 70B
Electrical Maintenance. NFPA 70 is the main standard. For documentation see question number 12


15. What are the training requirements to be certified as a qualified electrical person?

NFPA 70E.110.2 Training Requirements.

(A) Safety Training. The training requirements contained in this section shall apply to employees who face a risk of electrical hazard that is not reduced to a safe level by the applicable electrical installation requirements. Such employees shall be trained to
understand the specific hazards associated with electrical energy. They shall be trained in safety-related work practices and procedural requirements, as necessary, to provide protection from the electrical hazards associated with their respective job or task assignments. Employees shall be trained to identify and understand the relationship between electrical hazards and possible injury.

Informational Note: For further information concerning installation requirements, see NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code®.

NFPA COMMENTS: A base expectation of Article 110 is that when operating normally, an installation is safe if all of the following conditions are met: It has been installed in accordance with the NEC.

It has been installed in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions.

It has been installed in accordance with any requirements that are mandated by a product listing.

It is adequately maintained using the manufacturer's recommendations and/or the recommendations from recognized industry practices such as NFPA 70B.

If the installation or equipment fails to meet these conditions, employees face an elevated risk of injury. For example, an equipment door or cover left with fasteners unlatched or equipment that is not adequately maintained does not meet the requirements of the NEC, and both of these situations cause employees to be exposed to an electrical hazard.

Each employee who is or might be exposed to an elevated risk of injury by exposure to an electrical hazard must be trained to understand the specific hazards to which he or she might be exposed. To increase understanding, the training should include the following:

  • What electrical hazards are present in the workplace
  • How each electrical hazard affects body tissues How to determine the degree of each hazard How to avoid exposure to each hazard
  • How to minimize risk by body position
  • What PPE is needed for the employee to execute his or her work assignment
  • How to select and inspect PPE
  • What employer-provided procedures, including specific work practices, the employee must implement
  • How increased duration of exposure to an electrical hazard results in a higher frequency of injuries
  • How to perform a hazard identification and risk assessment analysis
  • How to determine limited, restricted, and prohibited approach boundaries and recognize that these boundaries are related to protection from exposure to electrical shock and electrocution
  • How to interpret the information on equipment labels [see 130.5(C)] and select the appropriate PPE when working within the arc flash boundary

Although 110.2(A) defines specific necessary training, the key term in this section is understand. The safety training must include all information and training processes necessary to achieve understanding. The training must develop an understanding of how to avoid all hazard exposure or how to minimize exposure if a hazard remains when the work is to be performed. Employees must understand the characteristics of protective equipment that might be necessary to avoid injury if an incident occurs while exposure exists. Employees must also understand that avoiding exposure is the only viable means of avoiding injury in event of an incident while the task is being
performed. Generally, employees should understand when, if, and how exposure to each hazard might exist at each step in the work task.



16. What is the best way to evaluate my electrical credentials, skills and knowledge?

Through a knowledge and skills evaluation examination. This examination will reveal the takers’ knowledge of electrical circuitry, theory, and understanding of safety applications. It also determines training needed to certify an individual as a qualified person.



17. Is there a course of study required to be qualified as an electrical maintenance person?

Yes, See DOE handbook 1003-96 Qualification Requirements of Maintenance Workers. Contact: The University of Alabama, College of Continuing Studies, UA Safe State, Mr. Peter Hodgson Telephone
205-348-4063,Email phodgson@ccs.ua.edu



18. What is a qualified electrical worker assessment?

An assessment determines the job task required by the employer and the training needed to become qualified in relation to that job task required by the employer.



19. What is a Risk Assessment?

When a worker determines the potential risk of any job task they may attempt.



20. What is a job task analysis?

This analysis determines the type work task or job task required by the employer of the employee. Qualifications must meet this requirement.



21. Can I submit prior learning as verification of training required
to meet the qualified person requirements for training?

Yes you can. This prior learning will be compared to the job task required by your employer and the DOE handbook 1003-96 for qualified persons.



22. Can I obtain my needed training to become qualified in an online
classroom or will I be required to attend all live training?

Can be either classroom, online, or a combination. Contact us to see what we can do for them and their specific situation.



23. What codes and standards pertain to a qualified electrical person?

(NFPA)National Fire Protection Association, (OSHA) Occupational Safety and Health Administration, (IEEE) International Electronic and Electrical Engineers,(NFPA)National Electrical Installation Standards, (NEMA)National Electrical Manufactures Association, and National Electrical Testing Association.



24. What is considered a passing grade?

75% is considered a passing grade by the DOE handbook 1003-96. We require 80%.



25. What type of documentation is required to prove I am a qualified person?

Interpretations given by both OSHA and NFPA indicate that certifications and degrees may or may not document electrical workers knowledge and skills training requirements. The key point is that training must be germane to the job task. Also on-the-job training requirements should be documented. The Knowledge and Skills training plus On-the-Job requirements can be found in the Department of Energy
Qualified Worker Handbook -1003-96. All Certifications and degrees must be germane to the type of work being performed by or required of the electrical worker.

NFPA COMMENT: Each employer must update the necessary records to indicate that each qualified person has received the training required by 110.2. The record must include the content of the training provided. The documentation must identify the employee and the date that the training was received. If hard copy documentation is a normal employer record, then the training documentation could be hard copy. If electronic records are the norm for an employer, then an electronic record is acceptable. However, the record must be available for inspection in some form by a third party.


Electrical Audits



1. How is an Audit of Electrical Safety Program performed?

This is a process to maintain and document your electrical safety program. It should document compliance with worker and training requirements.

  • Do your workers comply with your safety program?
  • Are your works up to date with proper training?



2. Does the audit include field work such as application of principles and procedures?

Yes, see NFPA 70E.110.3.H.2


3. Are there templates or checklists available to help design our annual audit?

Yes, requirements are found in NFPA 70E. 110; Annex to NFPA 70E, University of Alabama and Integrity Institute of Technology offer a Checklist.


PPE Requirements



1. What PPE is needed for the employee to execute his or her work assignment?

This depends upon the potential electrical hazard that the employee may counter. The primary purpose of PPE is to protect from shock hazards and arc flash hazards. PPE should be recognized by labels, job briefings, flash hazard analysis, and qualified persons. The qualified person is responsible to recognize potential hazards and rectify and protect themselves as needed.



2. How do I select and inspect PPE?

Each PPE apparatus must be tested visually, electrically or mechanically before use. Each qualified person should be trained how to identify improper PPE and how to properly test PPE prior to use.



3. How do I know my required employer-procedures and specific work practices?

These should be readily available to each employee. Qualified Employees should not have to rely on others and should know all company policy and procedure prior to performing job task.



4.How can an increased duration of exposure to an electrical hazard
results in a higher frequency of injuries?

Arc flash hazards are evaluated based on time and intensity of the arc. Increased duration of exposure to an arc allows othercontributing factors to increase the amount of arc blast or flash. It is imperative to control the arc flash or blast as
quick as possible.



5. When am I required to use PPE?

Any time you're exposed within the flash boundary of switchboards, panel boards, industrial control panels, metersocket enclosures, and motor control centers in other than dwelling units which are likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, maintenance, or troubleshooting while energized shall require PPE. This requirement is found in NFPA 70. 110.16 and NFPA 70E.120&130



6. How do I determine PPE needed?

Only qualified persons can determine PPE needed for job task. The qualified person should have available labels, job briefings and flash hazard analysis to determine proper PPE needed. This does not negate the authority or responsibility of the employer to require needed PPE.



7. How do I know if my PPE is right for me?

PPE should always be tested on a dry run prior to use by the employee who will be performing the job task. Visibility and flexibility are two of the main criteria for determining proper PPE application for employee to the job task.



8. Do I need PPE for resetting a Circuit Breaker?

First step is to determine what caused the breaker to trip. Second step is to determine if a ground fault, short-circuit or overload calls the breaker to trip and rectify
the problem before reenergizing or resetting the breaker. If you are exposed to live parts while resetting the breaker you must have proper PPE.



9. Do I need PPE for replacing blown fuses?

First step is to determine what caused the breaker to trip. Second step is to determine if a ground fault, short-circuit or overload calls the breaker to trip and rectify the problem before reenergizing or resetting the breaker. If you are exposed to live parts while resetting the breaker you must have proper PPE.



10. Do I need PPE for troubleshooting?

Yes, because you're exposed to live parts which are energized. Troubleshooting requires that the worker the exposed to energize live parts to perform this duty



11. Do I need PPE for testing circuits?

Yes, if you're exposed to live parts which are energized.



12. What is a quick reference to use if I am unsure about the correct
PPE?

See table in NFPA 70 E. 130.C. 7 and associated tables.



13. Can I layer PPE to meet Category Risk Level Required?

Yes, as long as your PPE at each level is equal or better to the required category risk level. Different manufacturers have different applications and it would be good to consult with your PPE manufacturer before making this decision



14. Are hairnets required to have PPE ratings?

Yes, when hairnets are used they must be arc-rated…. see NFPA 70 E, 130.7(C)(3): Revised to require hair nets and beard nets to be arc-rated.



15. Are shoes or boots required to have a category risk level?

Yes, See NFPA 70 E. 130.7.C.(8)(e) Foot Protection. Where insulated footwear is used as protection against step and touch potential, dielectric overshoes shall be
required. Insulated soles shall not be used as primary electrical protection.

Informational Note: EH (Electrical Hazard) shoes meeting ASTM F 2413 can provide a secondary source of electric shock protection under dry conditions.

Changed From 2009

•130.7(C)(8) Informational Note: Added new informational note on the use of EH (electrical hazard) shoes as secondary source of electric shock protection.

If the hazard identification and risk assessment procedure indicates that the employee's feet and legs could be exposed to an arc flash, arc-rated clothing worn to protect thelower torso must protect the legs from exposure. Heavy-duty leather work shoes also must cover the employee's feet.

The integrity of the insulating quality of shoes with insulated soles cannot be established easily after they have been worn in a work environment. Therefore, shoes with insulated soles must not serve as the primary protection from touch and step potential in a dry environment. If shock protection is warranted, the employee must wear dielectric overshoes (boots), use rubber insulating mats, or a combination of these two protective items. Other protective techniques such as equipotential bonding can also be used for shock protection.

(e) Foot Protection. Heavy-duty leather work shoes provide some arc flash protection to the feet and shall be used in all exposures greater than 4 cal/cm2.

Changed From 2009

•130.7(C)(10)(e): Revised by removing reference to H/R Category 2 tasks resulting in heavy duty work shoes being required for all exposures greater than 4 cal/cm2 regardless of whether it is determined by calculation or through the hazard/risk category table.

Shoes with an arc rating are not available. However, experience has shown that heavy-duty leather work shoes offer significant protection for the feet. Normally, the employee's feet are less exposed than his or her hands or head. However, employees should not wear shoes made from lightweight material. In most cases, heavy-duty leather work shoes with integral steel toes are satisfactory.

Only heavy-duty leather work shoes must be worn if the hazard identification and risk assessment procedure indicates that arc flash protection is necessary while the
task is performed.



16. What type gloves do I need in each Category Risk level?

Class rating and voltage are two important factors to match
up. See NFPA 70E.130.7.C.10.d.1

(d) Hand Protection.

(1) Heavy-duty leather gloves or arc-rated gloves shall be worn where required for arc flash protection.

Changed From 2009

•130.7(C)(10)(d)(1) and Informational Note: Revised to require that heavy-duty or arc-rated gloves be used for arc flash protection. This informational note provides guidance on material thickness, lining material and ATPV value expected from this type of glove.

If an electrically safe work condition has not been established, the qualified employee must wear protection for his or her hands and arms. The protection must eliminate the
possibility that the employee might be electrocuted. With the exception of rubber insulating gloves with leather protectors, shock-protective equipment might not provide protection from the associated thermal hazard.



17. Are all workers who enter the MMC required to wear PPE for the largest level of PPE needed?

If exposed to live parts you are only required to wear PPE to level of exposure



18. What is the difference between Arc Rating and Flame Rating?

ARC is based on energy level which includes heat, pressure, and flame while the flame rating is based on the level of heat or flame to which the worker is exposed.



19. Is hearing protection required in a category risk location?

Yes, based on projected DB level and potential energy incident hazard.



20. Is hearing protection required to have arc and/or flame resistant
rating?

Yes, based on projected DB level and potential energy incident hazard.



21. Does the back of the head require PPE protection when facing a
category risk level?

Yes, complete protection is required.


Risk Assessment



1. What does Risk Assessment mean in relation to electrical safety?

The purpose is to allow qualified persons to assessments of risk on the job. It is virtually impossible for one standard to cover all circumstances and situations a worker may encounter. Standards should be used as a guide that gives qualified workers guidance.



2. Who can perform risk assessments in an electrical environment?

Only a Qualified Person.



3. How do we perform a risk assessment?

The standards should be the guide. The decision about a hazardous situation should be made by a qualified person(s).



4. How do I determine if the risk is high or low?

The qualified person should be trained on how to make this decision. Some procedures are/may be pre-determined by the AHJ.



5. What is the difference between electrical risk assessment and risk management?

Both are akin to each other but assessment is designed to give the qualified person authority to make decisions in the field while management would make procedure and policy requirements.

Last modified: Monday, 23 June 2014, 7:14 PM